Author Topic: A good day's work!  (Read 23246 times)

Offline Sverre

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Made some progress on a pet project my dad and I have been working on for the past year or so today, and thought I should document it with a few photos.



Good (and SHARP) tools are essential:


Two down:


Four to go... :shock:

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Offline Captain Tophat

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Fantastic stuff, Sverre. I love doing these sorts of projects. Gransfors axes are absolutely fantastic. Definitely a working man's axe. I could go the rest of my life without seeing another fiberglass or, *gasp*, molded plastic axe or hatchet handle.

What are the costs like for tools like that in your neck of the woods (pardon the pun)? Proper woodworking tools can vary so much. Personally, for smaller scale projects I'd just as soon use a large fixed blade knife than a small axe or hatchet. What's the project that you're working on? Cabin?

C'mon spill the beans!
« Last Edit: April 07, 2012, 08:58:38 PM by Captain Tophat »

Offline Sverre

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It's for a small barbeque house in the garden; built in the traditional timber frame style which was used for sheds, boathouses and barns along the coast of western Norway in the old days.





http://www.jordbruk.info/grindverksbygg/grindverksbygg.htm

We originally planned to use round timber for the posts, but to keep it more historically correct, we decided to use squared off posts instead, so that's given us (i.e. me) a lot of last-minute work :lol:

The eave plates - two halves of a hand-split trunk - and the beams were all finished last year. We try to do most of the work the old fashioned way, but rafters and panelling were sent to a sawmill. In addition to the posts, we also have knees/braces left to do, but those can be made and fitted after the rest of the frame has been completed.

After the posts are finished, the snow will hopefully be gone so we can begin with the dry stone wall foundation, which I'm really looking forward to. Just like with the woodwork, the plan is to use hand tools on the stones as well.

Gransfors axes are absolutely fantastic.

What are the costs like for tools like that in your neck of the woods (pardon the pun)?

Gränsfors isn't cheap, but in my opinion, they're worth every penny. Quality and amazing workmanship through and through!

As for price, the Small Forest Axe was NOK 595 (USD 102) and the Large Splitting Axe was NOK 735 (USD 127) when I bought them a couple of years ago, which isn't too bad actually. Judging by the latest quote I got from my Gränsfors retailer, there seems to have been a 10 per cent price increase on at least some of the models though, and if you're looking for speciality tools, like the right angled Swedish Broad Axe shown in picture two, the price is NOK 1795 (USD 310) :eek:

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Offline Captain Tophat

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Excellent. I'm extremely jealous of your project. Looks and sounds amazing. That's exactly the kind of hard work that personally, I find worth doing and enjoy the process as much as the result. I applaud your adhering to tradition as well. There is something truly to be said about skills such as those. There's a reason so many hand built structures are still around throughout the world...quality.

The foundation will be a trip. When we did a sea wall with mostly traditional labour, if not materials, it took some serious finagling to get things to sit right.

Keep us updated!

Offline Sverre

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I'm very unreliable as a photographer - the first time I met Slash I actually forgot that I had a camera in my pocket :lol: so I can't promise anything, but I'll do my best to keep you updated throughout the rest of the process.

That's exactly the kind of hard work that personally, I find worth doing and enjoy the process as much as the result. I applaud your adhering to tradition as well. There is something truly to be said about skills such as those.

Luckily, there are still some individuals who keep these traditions alive, but learning and preserving the skills is definitely a major reason why we're doing this. My dad worked a few years as a carpenter in his youth, but we're both pretty green when it comes to this specific construction style and the techniques involved, so we learn as we go. In addition to books and various Internet resources, we're also fortunate enough to be able to ask a local carpenter with some experience from this type of work for advice/help if we should need it though.

The foundation will be a trip. When we did a sea wall with mostly traditional labour, if not materials, it took some serious finagling to get things to sit right.

I'm counting on that, but we've acquired stone which should be relatively easy to work with, so hopefully, it won't be too gruelling and time-consuming.

Offline Captain Tophat

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Sounds way too cool. I look forward to your results! How are you fastening everything together?


Offline Captain Tophat

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Choice.

What kinds of wood are you using, all around? (This interview could go on for a while)

Offline Sverre

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Traditionally, they just used whatever they had available, or was most easily attainable. Scots Pine was probably the most commonly used timber, but Norway Spruce and Downy Birch/European White Birch were also common choices. They all have their strengths and weaknesses, but one isn't necessarily better than the other. One wood's characteristics can make it more suitable for certain parts of the construction though. We will mostly use spruce, but the poles I'm currently working on are all pine and nails and possibly some of the braces are likely to be birch.

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Offline aerosmith513

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Awesome. I've always wanted to do something like that but I don't have the space.  With hand tools and powertools, I think its worth it to buy nice tools because time=money and the nicer the tools, the more time you save (usually).

Offline Sverre

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I definitely agree with your notion about choosing and using good tools, but if time=money, you REALLY don't want to embark on a project like this! :P

Offline Sverre

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Squared off all four sides on another post today, and took some step-by-step pictures along the way:



Tried out a new idea I hatched late last night about using a template to mark the 9 x 9 inch section on the round log, and it's a keeper!


To save the edge on the broad axes, it helps to remove the dirty outer layer of bark


A board nailed to the top of the log creates a straight and effective line of sight, and strategically placed notches chopped into the side of the log reduces the chance for the broad axe to dig in and break away large pieces in an uncontrollable fashion.


The hewing is done in several stages:

from rough


to a more polished finish


and the finished product

Offline Velvet Revolver

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I'm just so incredibly in awe of what you are doing.  Good work!

Offline Captain Tophat

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This is fantastic. Can I help?


Offline Captain Tophat

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Including the sex swing and the pot plants under it?

Offline Velvet Revolver

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It's outdoors.  I do not have an 8' fence.  And those are not pot plants.

Offline Trist805#2

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Sverre, your gonna have to hook that thing up with internet access lol

Offline Sverre

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Can I help?

Besides all the encouraging words, that may be a bit difficult to arrange, but sure... :D

Sverre when you're done with that...can you make me this?  http://www.modernarchitectureconcept.com/a-modern-unique-garden-furniture/a-modern-unique-garden-furniture3/

You mean after the timber frame woodshed and carport also have been completed? :P

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Yeah...I'll be patient.   :lol:

Offline Captain Tophat

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If you've got a spare couch I can be on a plane at the end of the week...

 :D

Any plans to treat it, if at all?

Offline born2boogie

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Quote
It's for a small barbeque house in the garden; built in the traditional timber frame style which was used for sheds, boathouses and barns along the coast of western Norway in the old days.








http://www.jordbruk.info/grindverksbygg/grindverksbygg.htm

We originally planned to use round timber for the posts, but to keep it more historically correct, we decided to use squared off posts instead, so that's given us (i.e. me) a lot of last-minute work :lol:

The eave plates - two halves of a hand-split trunk - and the beams were all finished last year. We try to do most of the work the old fashioned way, but rafters and panelling were sent to a sawmill. In addition to the posts, we also have knees/braces left to do, but those can be made and fitted after the rest of the frame has been completed.

After the posts are finished, the snow will hopefully be gone so we can begin with the dry stone wall foundation, which I'm really looking forward to. Just like with the woodwork, the plan is to use hand tools on the stones as well.

I love it.. I want one!  ;)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 04:16:54 PM by born2boogie »