Author Topic: Duff on Twitter ~  (Read 28391 times)

Offline Velvet Revolver

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"@GNRclub: Today in History, March 6th, 1981 - The Fastbacks, with @DuffMcKagan on Drums, open a show for @joanjett." it was epic too!

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Check it out! http://bit.ly/AjyafF. @swreverb on Kindle now. Fancy!

Dearest Weekly Readers: We're excited to announce that Seattle Weekly is now available on Amazon's Kindle and Kindle Fire! This is the Weekly's second product available to Kindle users: Our music magazine, Reverb Monthly, has been available for several months. If you're a Kindle or Kindle Fire user -- and there are more and more of us every day -- you can subscribe to the Weekly via the Kindle store for $1.99 a month. But you can try it free for the first two weeks.

That's right: We're a free weekly that's CHARGING for our Kindle edition! There are a couple reasons for this. First, there are no ads on the Kindle edition. Second, there are no free periodical subscriptions on the Kindle store.
 
When we launched Reverb Monthly on the Kindle, I wondered out loud how many of our readers would be willing to pay for something on the Kindle that they can get for free online and in print. As I mentioned before, I've subscribed to Kindle editions of online publications (Slate, Politico, etc.) that were free online. I was not surprised to learn there are quite a few of our music readers who enjoy reading our prose on a Kindle, and are willing to pay a modest fee for the convenience. Now the rest of you can check it out, too.

If you have a Kindle but have yet to subscribe to a publication, please give us a try. I think you'll enjoy the "silence" of the newspaper experience on the eReader.

Offline Velvet Revolver

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McKagan: Remembering the legendary Buck Compton

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/thelife/music/news/story?id=7653715


Remembering a legendary WWII hero
 

Originally Published: March 6, 2012
 By Duff McKagan | Special to ESPN.com

Most times, I would say that bringing light to the passing of someone outside of sports would be out of form here at ESPN.com. But sometimes there are just excellent people who walk this planet who sort of transcend everything. Lt. Lynn D. "Buck" Compton seemed to be one of those.

Buck Compton died last week at his daughter's home in Burlington, Wash., at the age of 90.

I would assume that in this male-dominated realm of professional sports that we like the idea of our "man" stuff. We like to watch MMA fighters ground-and-pound with impunity, or NFL wide receivers going over the middle, taking great risks to hopefully gain great rewards. They all make it look so easy, and maybe a small part of us lives through this grandeur of athleticism. Man stuff.

We like to transpose our real-life frustrations into the grace, ease and hardcor-ness of our heroes on the court, pitch, gridiron, ring or ballfield. Hell, half of us think we can do that stuff, given half the chance -- especially after a couple of beers.

A lot of you know of either Stephen Ambrose's book "Band Of Brothers," or have seen the HBO miniseries. The subject matter of 101st Airborne's Easy Company, and its epic journey from the beaches of D-Day Normandy to Hitler's Eagles Nest, is pure man stuff too.

Buck Compton played a pivotal real-life role in Easy Company's long and arduous campaign from D-Day to the brutal Battle of the Bulge, and the parachuted-in-behind-enemy-lines Operation Market Garden to the brutally freezing Ardennes. After coming back from the war, he went back to school and earned a law degree. He became a Los Angeles cop and rose to Los Angeles County deputy district attorney (successfully leading the three-man team that convicted RFK's assassin, Sirhan Sirhan) and eventually went on to become a judge in the California Court of Appeal. He was a college standout in baseball and football at UCLA before the war, playing with Jackie Robinson on both Bruin squads to boot!

Two years ago, my band Loaded had the honor to play halftime at a Seattle Seahawks game on their Veterans Appreciation Day. The raiser on the 12th Man flag that day was none other than the infamous Lt. Compton. If you have ever been to a Seahawks game, you would know of the honor bestowed on the flag-raiser. Local heroes from Felix Hernandez, Nate McMillan, Bill Russell and Ken Griffey Jr. have all gotten the 70,000 fans there on their feet before the game. But when they introduced Compton, the roar was something otherworldly. It was a sound that passed beyond the appreciation of a typical sports crow, to something that was one part patriotic, another part awestruck and yet another part historic. Buck Compton was a man's man among boys. We all thought we were tough and bad-ass until he -- even at 88 years old -- stepped up to that flagpole.

Compton did a few speaking appearances after the HBO series came out. As a longtime lawyer and judge, you could imagine that he was an eloquent speaker and could hold his own in public. The man never made his story seem any more important than any other combat soldier's story. As a matter of fact, he came off as a little embarrassed as to why his Easy Company was chosen to be put under such a public microscope.

We lost a good one. Those WWII vets are far and few between these days. If you get a chance, stop one of those guys next time you see them wearing one a "WWII Vet" baseball caps. Get their story and talk to a real-life hero.

 Musician Duff McKagan -- who writes for Seattle Weekly, has written for Playboy.com and now has his autobiography out -- writes a weekly sports column for ESPN.com. To send him a note, click here and fill out the form.

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Speedy few days practice with Loaded for Costa Rica. Flying out of Seattle now to go to Disneyland with @SuHolmesMcKagan and da girls!

Offline Velvet Revolver

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" @HOBCleveland http://on.fb.me/zvGu9B. Be the first on your block to see this rare ass show!" It's So Easy (and other lies)

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Book nerds unite! I am honored to be the guest author @litchat next week. Come on ovah?

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Thanks to @theravidhar for making this Cleveland House Of Blues webisode. http://bit.ly/yyElGt. He is a talent of epic proportion!

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Its like Christmas........!

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Here we go. Some new bass tones are gonna get invented at the McKagan laboratory 

Offline Velvet Revolver

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McKagan: Mark Lanegan's powerful new album http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/thelife/music/news/story?id=7683740

'Blues Funeral' a lasting effort
And now, for a break from all of the coverage on just where Peyton Manning is going to shot-call next season and who should or shouldn't be seeded No. 1 in NCAA men's basketball; here is a music suggestion that has some depth. Come along with me as I scratch beneath the surface of commercial rock music -- and mine a gem of an artist.

Growing up a kid in the '70s, it seemed that the deeper personal story of an artist would resonate with my child psyche. Artists like Sly Stone, the Clash, the Rolling Stones and Johnny Thunders would register on my anti-B.S. gauge much higher than, say, something more commercial and made for radio.

In the early '90s, a whole new generation of rock 'n' roll truth became de rigueur. The rock scene in Seattle started getting worldwide attention, and the players in this revolution all seemingly had a different angle on the mostly truer and less comfortable edges of life.



One of those players was the band Screaming Trees, led by the gnarly voice of one Mark Lanegan.

During Mark's tenure in the Trees, he began making his first solo records -- a more stripped-down affair that spoke more to the human-nature side of Mark and the trouble and strife that were saddled up next to him in his life then. We all go through our own crap in life, and records like the ones Mark was making then seemed to speak to many of us who listened.

After the Screaming Trees, Lanegan made the now infamous LPs "Field Songs" and "Bubblegum," all while doing singing duties as a member of Queens Of The Stone Age. He then joined alliances with Afghan Whigs frontman Greg Dulli to form The Gutter Twins -- maybe one of the best live bands to tour ... ever.

And that -- give or take a half dozen other endeavors -- brings us now to the long-awaited solo follow-up to "Bubblegum."

"Blues Funeral" by the Mark Lanegan Band came out last month, and it is a searing look into genius songwriting and performance. It is also a deep and experience-filled ride through the head space of a dude who has been through particular life torture chambers and survived through it all to tell us the truth. He has lived and died and lied enough that being straight-up these days is even more profound because of the trials of it all. These are the kind of records that stay around for a while.


Offline Velvet Revolver

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Offline Velvet Revolver

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Rehearsed today for the Cleveland HOB gig on 4/13. It really is quite a beautiful 3D show. Paul is a pedal-steel master!

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Gonna be on Good Day LA in a few minutes......and doing a Google 'hangout'. Watch me be fancy!


Offline Velvet Revolver

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Vote for me wearing a kilt AND help Ronald McDonald House? Easy, breezy! http://www.meninkilts.rmhcseattle.org


Offline Velvet Revolver

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I'm getting blown up by Clones!


Offline Velvet Revolver

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Offline Velvet Revolver

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Either one of my daughters forgot to feed these two, or these dogs are GREAT liars! http://yfrog.com/kghnggoj

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Ah, hell. I've gotten a ton of good words from the clones of @jimrome. Jungle kharma shall be passed on. Good dudes, the lot of ya!

Offline Velvet Revolver

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LAX security line at frickin MIDNITE?!!! We need more TSA, yo? Seriously? http://yfrog.com/mgo1etrj

Offline Velvet Revolver

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McKagan: Full circle with Jim Rome http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/thelife/music/news/story?id=7743670

A big step into Jim Rome's jungle

Most of you may know of my personal story. You know: rock guy, booze, drugs, more drugs, yet more booze ... and then the eventual fall into the hospital. The hospital was a brutal chance for me to get a peek inside my mortality. Hello, reality. Hello, fear. And hello, trying to figure some stuff out, without the bottle and the powder and the pills.

"You drink, you die," said the doctor, after I got clear of the possibility of actually expiring there in that triage ward in a Seattle hospital. OK. What now?

I got back to Los Angeles a shaky, terrified mess. My body was beat up, and my mind was racing a million miles an hour. Panic.

One of the first things I tried was to wake up at a somewhat-normal hour. Say, 7:30 a.m. I mean, what does everyone else do? They get up early and do stuff, right? Except my workday didn't really start until 9 p.m. Oh, well, I'd get to that later.

One of the things I did to stave off the shakes from the get-go was to get on an old and rusted mountain bike that was somehow in my garage and just ride. Because there was fear of what I'd do to myself if I wasn't riding (i.e., drink!), I thusly rode for eight freaking hours a day until I was just too exhausted to do anything but eat some food (a novel idea) and drink water (something I hadn't done EVER for the previous 10 or 11 years). I was 30 years old and starting from absolute scratch.

In my quest to be "normal," or at least try, I began to listen to this sports radio show with some dude named "Rome." I have always been a huge sports fan, but more of the pedestrian and "homer" sort. Jim Rome brought a style and youth to sports talk down there in L.A. It wasn't provincial, and he took no prisoners. It was "punk rock," if you will. This show became my focus of those first days and months of sobriety. I'd be entertained by the "clones," as Rome's loyal listeners and callers are known, and riveted by Romey's guests. The show became a clarion safe place to temper the pain and struggle of what I was then going through.

As a result, I still listen to the show some 17 years later and hold it in high regard for something much more than just sports. Rome gets us through things. Things like having kids. Things like putting up with dummies in our daily lives, with a whole, heaping truckload of humor and innuendo. Thanks, Jim. Thanks, dude.

And thank you for getting us through 9/11. Sure, media of all types swerved away from their usual programming for those days and weeks following the attack, but Rome brought a humanness and emotion that spoke seemingly to all of us. It was real and brutal and deep. Those pregnant radio pauses when Rome had to gather himself were poignant beyond words.

And more to the point of why I am writing all of this stuff right now: As it turns out, I have been on a sort of media blitz for my book as of late. I've done "Good Day LA," KROQ (and about 30 other FM rock morning shows). I've done newspaper interviews and weekly newspapers interviews.

But it wasn't until I was confirmed to do the Jim Rome Show last Thursday that I kind of "gripped." I mean, hell! What if I was one of those unfortunates who froze up and Rome gave the buzzer shutdown to? What if the "clones" piled on? I was going to do this thing no matter what and at least try to convey to Jim what his show has meant to me.

We ended up having a great conversation, and he gave me the time to settle down and just talk. He made it feel like I was talking to an old friend, which is how I saw it, anyway.

My wife told me later that day that I had gotten, like, "a billion" new Twitter followers. When I went online to see for myself, I was overwhelmed by the "clones" of Rome's show. Dudes (mostly) who were all pulling for me to some degree. It's pretty cool to have "Jungle Karma" now. It makes me feel a bit more comfortable writing about sports here.

Ah, hell ... who am I kidding? I don't write about sports here. I write about that other stuff. The heroes. The in-between stuff. And yes, my Seattle teams ... which could use a little Jungle Karma themselves.

Offline vfly79

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That's for damn sure about those Seattle Teams! :lol:

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Day 2 Costa Rica: Loaded/Shadow coffee summit. Mae McKagan is hangin w/the fellas (her 'uncles'!). http://yfrog.com/oehwsitj


Offline Velvet Revolver

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McCready cantoring from high atop the (caffeine) mound! http://yfrog.com/oc56rpsj

Offline Velvet Revolver

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Holy crap Costa Rica! What a night. Thank you for the sell out and the passion! Loaded and Shadow hail you all. Duff. LAMF