Velvet Revolver Forum

General => Mosh Pit => Topic started by: Sverre on April 07, 2012, 04:51:20 PM

Title: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 07, 2012, 04:51:20 PM
Made some progress on a pet project my dad and I have been working on for the past year or so today, and thought I should document it with a few photos.

(http://img19.imageshack.us/img19/7136/img20120407154211.jpg) (http://img19.imageshack.us/img19/7136/img20120407154211.jpg)

Good (and SHARP) tools are essential:
(http://img191.imageshack.us/img191/6504/img20120407154244.jpg) (http://img191.imageshack.us/img191/6504/img20120407154244.jpg)

Two down:
(http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/29/img20120407160329.jpg) (http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/29/img20120407160329.jpg)

Four to go... :shock:
(http://img842.imageshack.us/img842/1513/img20120407160352.jpg) (http://img842.imageshack.us/img842/1513/img20120407160352.jpg)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 07, 2012, 05:01:34 PM
Good work!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 07, 2012, 08:55:10 PM
Fantastic stuff, Sverre. I love doing these sorts of projects. Gransfors axes are absolutely fantastic. Definitely a working man's axe. I could go the rest of my life without seeing another fiberglass or, *gasp*, molded plastic axe or hatchet handle.

What are the costs like for tools like that in your neck of the woods (pardon the pun)? Proper woodworking tools can vary so much. Personally, for smaller scale projects I'd just as soon use a large fixed blade knife than a small axe or hatchet. What's the project that you're working on? Cabin?

C'mon spill the beans!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 08, 2012, 04:23:18 AM
It's for a small barbeque house in the garden; built in the traditional timber frame style which was used for sheds, boathouses and barns along the coast of western Norway in the old days.

(http://img546.imageshack.us/img546/3816/grindk.jpg) (http://img546.imageshack.us/img546/3816/grindk.jpg)

(http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/3583/grind2.jpg) (http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/3583/grind2.jpg)

http://www.jordbruk.info/grindverksbygg/grindverksbygg.htm

We originally planned to use round timber for the posts, but to keep it more historically correct, we decided to use squared off posts instead, so that's given us (i.e. me) a lot of last-minute work :lol:

The eave plates - two halves of a hand-split trunk - and the beams were all finished last year. We try to do most of the work the old fashioned way, but rafters and panelling were sent to a sawmill. In addition to the posts, we also have knees/braces left to do, but those can be made and fitted after the rest of the frame has been completed.

After the posts are finished, the snow will hopefully be gone so we can begin with the dry stone wall foundation, which I'm really looking forward to. Just like with the woodwork, the plan is to use hand tools on the stones as well.

Gransfors axes are absolutely fantastic.

What are the costs like for tools like that in your neck of the woods (pardon the pun)?

Gränsfors isn't cheap, but in my opinion, they're worth every penny. Quality and amazing workmanship through and through!

As for price, the Small Forest Axe was NOK 595 (USD 102) and the Large Splitting Axe was NOK 735 (USD 127) when I bought them a couple of years ago, which isn't too bad actually. Judging by the latest quote I got from my Gränsfors retailer, there seems to have been a 10 per cent price increase on at least some of the models though, and if you're looking for speciality tools, like the right angled Swedish Broad Axe shown in picture two, the price is NOK 1795 (USD 310) :eek:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 08, 2012, 04:26:33 AM
Wow even more impressive!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 08, 2012, 10:32:42 AM
Excellent. I'm extremely jealous of your project. Looks and sounds amazing. That's exactly the kind of hard work that personally, I find worth doing and enjoy the process as much as the result. I applaud your adhering to tradition as well. There is something truly to be said about skills such as those. There's a reason so many hand built structures are still around throughout the world...quality.

The foundation will be a trip. When we did a sea wall with mostly traditional labour, if not materials, it took some serious finagling to get things to sit right.

Keep us updated!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 08, 2012, 04:45:50 PM
I'm very unreliable as a photographer - the first time I met Slash I actually forgot that I had a camera in my pocket :lol: so I can't promise anything, but I'll do my best to keep you updated throughout the rest of the process.

That's exactly the kind of hard work that personally, I find worth doing and enjoy the process as much as the result. I applaud your adhering to tradition as well. There is something truly to be said about skills such as those.

Luckily, there are still some individuals who keep these traditions alive, but learning and preserving the skills is definitely a major reason why we're doing this. My dad worked a few years as a carpenter in his youth, but we're both pretty green when it comes to this specific construction style and the techniques involved, so we learn as we go. In addition to books and various Internet resources, we're also fortunate enough to be able to ask a local carpenter with some experience from this type of work for advice/help if we should need it though.

The foundation will be a trip. When we did a sea wall with mostly traditional labour, if not materials, it took some serious finagling to get things to sit right.

I'm counting on that, but we've acquired stone which should be relatively easy to work with, so hopefully, it won't be too gruelling and time-consuming.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 08, 2012, 04:50:30 PM
Sounds way too cool. I look forward to your results! How are you fastening everything together?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 08, 2012, 05:21:01 PM
Treenails.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 08, 2012, 05:25:06 PM
Choice.

What kinds of wood are you using, all around? (This interview could go on for a while)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 08, 2012, 06:37:47 PM
Traditionally, they just used whatever they had available, or was most easily attainable. Scots Pine was probably the most commonly used timber, but Norway Spruce and Downy Birch/European White Birch were also common choices. They all have their strengths and weaknesses, but one isn't necessarily better than the other. One wood's characteristics can make it more suitable for certain parts of the construction though. We will mostly use spruce, but the poles I'm currently working on are all pine and nails and possibly some of the braces are likely to be birch.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 08, 2012, 06:38:53 PM
Way cool!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: aerosmith513 on April 09, 2012, 03:24:46 AM
Awesome. I've always wanted to do something like that but I don't have the space.  With hand tools and powertools, I think its worth it to buy nice tools because time=money and the nicer the tools, the more time you save (usually).
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 09, 2012, 03:36:46 AM
I definitely agree with your notion about choosing and using good tools, but if time=money, you REALLY don't want to embark on a project like this! :P
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 09, 2012, 04:45:10 PM
Squared off all four sides on another post today, and took some step-by-step pictures along the way:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_125721.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_125721.jpg)

Tried out a new idea I hatched late last night about using a template to mark the 9 x 9 inch section on the round log, and it's a keeper!
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_130309.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_130309.jpg)

To save the edge on the broad axes, it helps to remove the dirty outer layer of bark
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_131500.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_131500.jpg)

A board nailed to the top of the log creates a straight and effective line of sight, and strategically placed notches chopped into the side of the log reduces the chance for the broad axe to dig in and break away large pieces in an uncontrollable fashion.
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_132347.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_132347.jpg)

The hewing is done in several stages:

from rough
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_133212.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_133212.jpg)

to a more polished finish
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_135935.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_135935.jpg)

and the finished product
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_174208.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120409_174208.jpg)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 09, 2012, 04:48:35 PM
I'm just so incredibly in awe of what you are doing.  Good work!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 10, 2012, 04:08:53 PM
This is fantastic. Can I help?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 10, 2012, 05:43:10 PM
Sverre when you're done with that...can you make me this?  http://www.modernarchitectureconcept.com/a-modern-unique-garden-furniture/a-modern-unique-garden-furniture3/
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 10, 2012, 05:53:50 PM
Including the sex swing and the pot plants under it?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 10, 2012, 06:04:24 PM
It's outdoors.  I do not have an 8' fence.  And those are not pot plants.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Trist805#2 on April 10, 2012, 06:44:48 PM
Sverre, your gonna have to hook that thing up with internet access lol
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 11, 2012, 03:25:49 PM
Can I help?

Besides all the encouraging words, that may be a bit difficult to arrange, but sure... :D

Sverre when you're done with that...can you make me this?  http://www.modernarchitectureconcept.com/a-modern-unique-garden-furniture/a-modern-unique-garden-furniture3/

You mean after the timber frame woodshed and carport also have been completed? :P
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 11, 2012, 03:26:57 PM
Yeah...I'll be patient.   :lol:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 11, 2012, 03:46:20 PM
If you've got a spare couch I can be on a plane at the end of the week...

 :D

Any plans to treat it, if at all?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: born2boogie on April 11, 2012, 04:13:25 PM
Quote
It's for a small barbeque house in the garden; built in the traditional timber frame style which was used for sheds, boathouses and barns along the coast of western Norway in the old days.

(http://img546.imageshack.us/img546/3816/grindk.jpg)


(http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/3583/grind2.jpg)



http://www.jordbruk.info/grindverksbygg/grindverksbygg.htm

We originally planned to use round timber for the posts, but to keep it more historically correct, we decided to use squared off posts instead, so that's given us (i.e. me) a lot of last-minute work :lol:

The eave plates - two halves of a hand-split trunk - and the beams were all finished last year. We try to do most of the work the old fashioned way, but rafters and panelling were sent to a sawmill. In addition to the posts, we also have knees/braces left to do, but those can be made and fitted after the rest of the frame has been completed.

After the posts are finished, the snow will hopefully be gone so we can begin with the dry stone wall foundation, which I'm really looking forward to. Just like with the woodwork, the plan is to use hand tools on the stones as well.

I love it.. I want one!  ;)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 11, 2012, 04:24:44 PM
Don't try budging in front of me Collette...I know hockey moves and am not afraid to smash you into the boards.   :lol:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: born2boogie on April 12, 2012, 08:07:45 AM
Don't try budging in front of me Collette...I know hockey moves and am not afraid to smash you into the boards.   :lol:

I cant fight my way out of a wet paper bag.. so you win  :lol:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 12, 2012, 09:45:18 AM
Yeah! I knew someday being a hockey fan would pay off.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 12, 2012, 02:58:19 PM
Any plans to treat it, if at all?

We're still debating that. The natural patina of untreated wood would look totally wicked on a building like this, and both the spruce and pine (most of the sapwood has been hewn off from the posts) we're using should be able to last for generations without treatment provided that they are allowed to dry up once in a while. The damp coastal climate and the fact that our house and garage have been stained in a brownish hue speak in favour of staining it though...

If you've got a spare couch I can be on a plane at the end of the week...

Hehehe... I don't think it would be much fun for you to sit around twiddling your thumbs for a whole week while I'm at work though. And most likely, I'll finish the hewing part for now on Saturday. As mentioned earlier, there will be other projects in the future, so if you're serious about this, there might be opportunities for a visit then.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 12, 2012, 07:01:12 PM
I love doing projects like this, so I would be up for it.

But realistically speaking, I'll have to stick to such things in this part of the world, for the time being.

There isn't much work more satisfying than something physical and constructive.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 14, 2012, 03:39:48 PM
Three logs in two days and all six posts are finally done!

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120414_180023.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120414_180023.jpg)

And not a moment too soon if we want them dry enough to build with this summer...

Now I'm really looking forward to be able to relax a bit and spend some more time doing what I like best - fly fishing - before we start on the dry stone wall :D
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 14, 2012, 03:52:42 PM
Looks great!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on April 15, 2012, 01:54:46 AM
Very groovy!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: vfly79 on April 18, 2012, 11:19:43 AM
Very nice work, indeed.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 28, 2012, 05:13:11 PM
We had hoped to get started with the walling last weekend, but that ended in a rather heated debate over dry stone walling principles/techniques. My dad wanted to trace the stones to save time and space, which is a bit limited because of a change of plan since the building site was excavated, and also to get more wall meters out of the stone he has bought. Even though this would probably be more than good enough for our purpose, and create a wall which would stand strong for many generations, I just couldn't accept it, so I refused to help unless we build with the strength/the longest axis of the stones facing into the wall.

We're both equally stubborn, but during the week, we've reached a compromise where most of my complaints have been resolved. I still may have to accept a few traced stones, but at least it should be kept to a bare minimum.

Yesterday, I finally got started on the process of sorting the stones according to size and/or type, which is a real pain, but very important for the rest of the walling process. Today, everything was covered in snow, so now there will be another week's delay before we can begin on the wall...

In more positive news, I received three new Gränsfors axes today. The fourth is on backorder :grin: One Carpenter's Axe and both a small and large Straight Adze. I've never used an adze before, but it seems to have great potential for the type of work we've been doing, so that will be very interesting to try out.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on May 05, 2012, 09:32:05 AM
Yet another Saturday with abysmal weather, but at least we got started on the first wall today, and now that the foundation has been laid, progress on the next courses should be a lot quicker. Stone is a very difficult and unpredictable material to work with though, and the stone we have doesn't seem to be quite as easy to split as we had hoped...

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120505_171049.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120505_171049.jpg)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on May 05, 2012, 09:57:21 AM
That's beautiful stone work!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on May 05, 2012, 02:46:58 PM
Yeah, I'm pretty happy with how the foundation turned out, and I think my dad is glad he let me call most of the shots too :) It's straight and level with solid contact between each stone. Two of the stones had to be traced, but they're wide enough that it shouldn't really matter... I think :P
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on May 10, 2012, 04:15:46 PM
Progress on the wall is still slow, but at least we've managed to get a few more stones in place before I've had to leave for work these past couple of mornings.

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120509_105427.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120509_105427.jpg)

Tomorrow, I'm free from work, so hopefully, I can report of better progress then...
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on May 10, 2012, 04:35:25 PM
Looks good!   :)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on May 19, 2012, 11:40:23 AM
The walling has turned out to be much more time-consuming than we originally thought it would be, and due to conflicting schedules and strict quality standards :lol: we still got a LONG way to go, but here's a little status update:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120519_194412.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120519_194412.jpg)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120519_194622.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120519_194622.jpg)

Unfortunately, my dad only had a couple of hours to dedicate to the project today, so we only managed to finish four (three actually, since one of them split into two during shaping/trimming) stones before he had to leave. They were fairly tricky ones which required lots of work to fit to the adjoining bedrock though, so I'd still call it a good day's work :)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120519_194433.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120519_194433.jpg)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on May 19, 2012, 01:11:05 PM
That is going to be so beautiful when it's done. 
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on August 19, 2012, 06:10:39 PM
Any updates?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 02, 2012, 12:50:24 PM
Yes, but unfortunately not as much as I had hoped for. Stone has proved to be a very unforgiving building material to work with :? I'll see if I can post a few pictures of the current "progress" sometime later this week, but in the mean time, these pictures I was supposed to post back in June will have to do...

The first stones of the opposing wall's foundation:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120609_184305.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120609_184305.jpg)

An A-frame/a batter frame is essential, especially if you want both sides of the wall to look (somewhat) presentable:
 
(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120609_184447.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120609_184447.jpg)

A few more stones complete the foundation, and the top corner is also starting to take shape:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120623_233603.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120623_233603.jpg)

This is where we ran into a real snag which I'll tell you more about next time...
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 03, 2012, 06:26:20 AM
What you've done does look really nice
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Captain Tophat on September 06, 2012, 08:25:08 PM
Looks great Sverre.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 16, 2012, 03:41:25 PM
Sorry for the delay, but here's finally the update I promised you...

By the middle of June our supply of stone was running a bit low, so it started to become increasingly difficult to find exactly the stone we needed at every step. Therefore a new truckload was ordered from the quarry. Despite very specific requirements regarding the type of stones we needed, it became immediately apparent that the new batch of stones were nowhere near the standard of the first truckload we received.

Instead of large slabs between 10 and 20 cm thick, we got mostly smaller and thicker stones with little or no usable sides to use in the face of the wall... :?

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_135835.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_135835.jpg)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_140523.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_140523.jpg)

Well, at least the stones in the first batch had been relatively easy to split, so we settled on the thought that we should be able to create enough usable stones to complete the wall. Due to different schedules, other projects AND insane amounts of bloodthirsty gnats, it took a couple of weeks before the real disappointment hit us. It turns out that the stones are filled with tiny micro fractures going in every direction, so when you try to split them, they literally just fall to pieces. If you're really lucky, the side you need remains whole - at least until you try to dress it a bit - but usually, both sides are ruined.

As an example:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_135558.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_135558.jpg)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_135645.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_135645.jpg)

Splits into:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_204856.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_204856.jpg)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_205411.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120726_205411.jpg)

Frustrating to say the least... My theory is that the explosive charge must have been too strong when this batch of stone was quarried. Possibly in combination with a harder and more brittle type of rock. One thing is certain though, it ruined the four weeks of vacation I had dedicated to this project in July and August. We have been promised a chance to hand-pick a new small truckload as a compensation, but as long as we don't have any suitable place to store it, that won't help us in the short term.

Not everything has been bad though. A month ago we stumbled upon a great deal on a fireplace for the house :D A brand new Dovre 2020 CB, which had been collecting dust in the store's basement for several years after they stopped being a Dovre retailer:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120914_184759.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120914_184759.jpg)

And despite the problems with the new batch of stone - probably in large thanks to the remaining stones from the first batch - I'm actually quite pleased with the wall we've built so far:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120914_184458.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120914_184458.jpg)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20120914_184526.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_201200914_184526.jpg)

It's just that there's so much left to do...
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 16, 2012, 03:47:28 PM
The splits look bad in that second batch.  It's a shame that it delayed your building.  Good work on scoring the fireplace though.  The wall does look nice.  Hopefully the next batch of stone is better but winter is closing in fast...
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on June 01, 2013, 03:16:45 PM
The dry stone wall is still FAR from finished, but we've made some progress in key areas since the snow melted earlier this spring, and now we're actually getting really close to a point where the house can be raised :o

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20130601_204125.jpg) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/IMG_20130601_204125.jpg)

We just need a few more stones in the upper right corner to bring it up one additional course/layer. That shouldn't be too difficult, but we're running out to suitable stones for the task, so on Friday we're taking a trip to the quarry to handpick half a truckload as compensation for the bad batch we received last summer. That should hopefully give us plenty of stone to complete the whole project.

Today's session resulted in the completion of the bottom vent for the fireplace - currently seen plugged by a piece of wood. It was only one (and a half) stone, but the height difference between the two sides made it exceedingly tricky. The result looks pretty decent though, if I must say so myself 8)

Sorry for the lousy picture by the way. Not exactly what I'd call ideal light for cell phone photography today...
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on June 03, 2013, 02:10:04 AM
Looks good!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Limberly on June 03, 2013, 10:05:00 PM
How did I miss this topic?   Very impressive!  Both the stonework, so far, and the hand-hewn logs.  A lot of hard work put into this project, I can see that.  Look forward to seeing the final result. 
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on August 10, 2014, 05:44:08 PM
One year later, and the dry stone wall is still not completely finished... :nervous: We're at a stage where the house/timber frame can be raised though, and according to the plan, we'll start work on that in a few days. Hopefully, that means I should have lots of new pictures to share with you later this week.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on August 11, 2014, 03:18:25 AM
Looking forward to seeing them Sverre
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Limberly on August 12, 2014, 12:27:33 AM
Same here! 
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on August 19, 2014, 03:09:13 PM
Don't have the time to write anything now, but here are some pictures from last week's work on the project:

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0091_3.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0091_3.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0092_1.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0092_1.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0093_2.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0093_2.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0094_1.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0094_1.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0096_1.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0096_1.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0098.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0098.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0102_1.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0102_1.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0103_1.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0103_1.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0104_2.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0104_2.JPG)

(http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0105_1.JPG) (http://www.sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0105_1.JPG)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on August 19, 2014, 04:16:42 PM
Wow...very impressive Sverre!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Limberly on August 20, 2014, 10:03:03 PM
Nice!  Almost there! :)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on August 30, 2014, 05:02:54 AM
Trying something a little bit different for the fascia/gable boards. Using a japanese adze, or chouna, to make a distinctive "kikko pattern":

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0096.jpg) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0096.jpg)

I don't get the same smooth and consistent finish (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A8pn8TeEs8) seen in the work of japanese master carpenters. Probably partly due to insufficient practice and a less forgiving type of wood to work with. Or at least that's what I like to tell myself :P Still, I'm very happy with the result, and since they're made of pure pine heartwood, they should last for hundreds of years :)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on August 30, 2014, 06:54:37 AM
That's a great finish.  You did an excellent job!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on August 30, 2014, 11:00:45 AM
Here in Norway, and at least in this application, I think it's pretty unique, and even though this project is deeply rooted in local tradition, that's never a bad thing!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on August 30, 2014, 04:56:37 PM
I don't recall seeing it done here.  That's still fantastic that you taught yourself how to do it. 

Puts my drilling holes into bottles without breaking them or hurting myself to shame.   :lol:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 12, 2014, 04:45:18 PM
The last couple of weeks I've mostly been preoccupied with preparations and planning of the building's green roof, which we hope to finish sometime next week. In-between all the research and e-mails, I've still been able to get some much needed work done on the dry stone wall though.

So here's a quick look into the process behind a section of the wall which has bugged me for a "while"...

Picture from october 28 last year:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0046.jpg) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0046.jpg)

Two days later, I made a mock-up of a few possible sollutions, using a graphics editor (External url (7MB) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/g3192.png)). Then winter came and the dry stone wall was put on hold.

Now, ten and a half months later, I finally completed the section today, but before I reveal the result, it would be interesting to hear how you would have done it, and which sollution you think I went for?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 12, 2014, 05:05:48 PM
I would have used cement.  Lots and lots of it so it wouldn't fall over.

Staggering the stones is a must for it to be sturdy.  Perhaps doing a row occasionally facing the opposite direction.  Or maybe I should pay as much attention to Yard Crashers as I do the Bath and Kitchen Crasher shows on hgtv.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 12, 2014, 06:29:08 PM
Cement... :lol:

"Tracing" stones, where the stone's longest axis (strength) runs along the wall is something which should be avoided. There's no denying that it is a much faster, cheaper and easier way of building a wall though. The exception to this rule, as seen in the picture above, is the traced stones (depending on your perspective) often seen at corners/ends.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 12, 2014, 06:37:08 PM
This is why I don't build walls.  I hire people to do things like that.   :lol:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 21, 2014, 02:52:52 PM
I'll try to take a picture of the section of dry stone wall we finished last weekend soon, but today, I have something else to show you.

Yesterday, I got up at 5 AM to unload the components for the green roof we had ordered, and after a LOOOONG and hard day of work, the roof is almost done:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0102_2.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0102_2.JPG)

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0103_2.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0103_2.JPG)

The first sedum roof on a traditional trestle frame house? Possibly, but according to some historic references, it has actually been a local tradition to plant certain sedum species on turf roofs. The origin of this practice is not clear, but folklore suggests that the belief that sedum plants had magical properties which, among other things, warded against fire and lightning strikes could hold the answer :lol:

If you compare it to a homegrown turf roof, it wasn't exactly cheap. And since the house isn't attached to the foundation, the need for extra ballast on the roof presented a difficult problem as well. In the end, we ended up with a custom solution with almost 2 tons of gravel placed in ground reinforcement mats underneath the layer of sedum mats. Personally, I think it was well worth it though, and I can't wait to see what it will look like in full bloom :D
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 21, 2014, 04:25:45 PM
That's the first sedum roof I've seen.  It's nice!  How does it handle cold weather?  Do you have to water it if there's a drought? 

Please post pictures when it is in full bloom!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 21, 2014, 04:52:29 PM
Cold weather shouldn't be a problem as long as we don't get temperatures below the freezing point in the immediate future. Sedum is supposed to be able to withstand long dry spells, but this spring, summer and autumn it would probably have needed a little bit of watering from time to time. Usually, the climate is so humid here that watering shouldn't be necessary though, even with such a steep pitched roof.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Limberly on September 21, 2014, 09:12:17 PM
That's so cool! 
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 28, 2014, 03:38:56 PM
Another quick little update:

First, a couple of pics showing the section of dry stone wall I was talking about a few weeks back...

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0106_2.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0106_2.JPG)

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0107_2.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0107_2.JPG)

As you can see, I went for a solution based on mock-up number 7. Without the aid of these mock-ups, I highly doubt I would have ended up with such a good result :)

Any plans to treat it, if at all?

We're still debating that. The natural patina of untreated wood would look totally wicked on a building like this, and both the spruce and pine (most of the sapwood has been hewn off from the posts) we're using should be able to last for generations without treatment provided that they are allowed to dry up once in a while. The damp coastal climate and the fact that our house and garage have been stained in a brownish hue speak in favour of staining it though...

This is STILL a topic of heavy debate, especially since we (I) have decided to go for vertical instead of horizontal siding. That means whole walls would have to be replaced if it starts to rot, instead of just one or two planks at the bottom. While researching different types of stains and oils this weekend, I stumbled across something really interesting though. An ancient Japanese technique of preserving wood, called shou sugi ban/yakisugi. Here seen on a small piece of (plain and boring) spruce:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0105_3.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0105_3.JPG)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 28, 2014, 06:18:55 PM
Looks nice Sverre.  I like how that method of preserving looks.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on October 01, 2014, 02:09:30 PM
Ordered a bigger blowtorch today, so if it doesn't rain too much, we'll start to burn the siding this weekend... :smoking:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on October 01, 2014, 04:26:27 PM
 :lol:  New tools are awesome.  Same applies to cookware and craft supplies.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on October 14, 2014, 03:58:32 PM
How does the siding look?
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on November 30, 2014, 02:38:20 PM
That's a really good question...

Weather and real life stuff have made it difficult to work on the siding these past couple of months, but last weekend we finally had a chance to start on the siding for one of the gables.

Since we've decided to try to avoid battening the gaps between each board, the live edges first had to be adjusted to match the one on the adjoining board. This turned out to be quite a tricky task, but eventually, we found a decent - but still VERY time-consuming - way of doing it. If I remember it, I'll try to document the process once we start on the next gable.

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0193_1.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0193_1.JPG)

Here's the rig we used to char the siding. The side walls are there to keep the heat/flame more concentrated on the work piece. Next time, I think I'll try a steeper incline in an attempt to harness more of the chimney effect though...

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0195_1.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0195_1.JPG)

And here's the result after charring, brushing and washing:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0196_1.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/DSC_0196_1.JPG)

This week, the plan is to apply linseed oil to the charred boards as an additional preservative, and after a week or two of hardening/polymerisation indoors in a controlled environment, the first batch of siding should be ready :lol:
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on November 30, 2014, 04:20:45 PM
That is absolutely beautiful.  Good work Sverre!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on April 22, 2015, 04:23:39 PM
Just a quick picture to show you how the sedum roof is starting to sprout after the winter:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0254_1.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0254_1.JPG)

It looked a bit dry and starving at the end of winter. Probably due to A LOT of rain and wind in combination with the lack of a stable snow cover. After the Easter holidays, it finally got warm enough to add fertilizer though, and now we see change from day to day :)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on April 23, 2015, 02:54:07 AM
It's off to a good start.  You had a lack of snow too?  Wow.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Limberly on April 23, 2015, 09:52:28 PM
It looks great!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on September 14, 2015, 10:04:20 PM
It looks less and less likely that we'll finish the project this year, but we're about to start work on the siding shortly, so hopefully, most of the walls will be clad before winter. We're still debating how to char the gable boards without setting the adjoining birch bark and the whole roof on fire though... :nervous:

For now, here's a few pictures of the sedum roof taken at different stages in the growth cycle:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0267.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0267.JPG)

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0260_2.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0260_2.JPG)

Sedum album in full bloom about a month ago
(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0062.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0062.JPG)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on September 15, 2015, 05:31:59 PM
So pretty with the sedum.  Good luck with the charring and not burning.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Limberly on September 21, 2015, 10:56:00 AM
Looking good!
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on November 03, 2015, 05:22:05 PM
Here's a few more recent pics:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0094_4.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0094_4.JPG)

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0095_4.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0095_4.JPG)

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0097_1.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0097_1.JPG)
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on November 03, 2015, 05:27:34 PM
Nice!  You do good work.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Sverre on November 08, 2015, 02:49:51 PM
Made some more progress this weekend. Charring the gable boards is something I've dreaded ever since we decided to use the shou sugi ban method on the cladding. Our first configuration of welding blankets as shielding didn't work properly, so it nearly ended in disaster when a few pieces of birch bark caught fire...

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0044_4.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0044_4.JPG)

Eventually, we found a method which seemed to work pretty good though, and considering the circumstances, I think the result on the first two gable boards turned out acceptable:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0052_2.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0052_2.JPG)

Today, we went on to mount the siding i the gable:

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0060_4.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0060_4.JPG)

(http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0061_4.JPG) (http://sverreef.com/project_grind/2015/DSC_0061_4.JPG)

Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on November 09, 2015, 04:05:31 PM
I really like how it turned out.  That's a beautiful building.
Title: Re: A good day's work!
Post by: Velvet Revolver on January 28, 2016, 04:24:27 PM
An ancient Japanese technique of preserving wood, called shou sugi ban/yakisugi.

I've been seeing this used a lot on hgtv now.